Circuit Components

Updated: 2/2/2021
Circuit Components
You can find this storyboard in the following articles and resources:
Electrical Circuits Lesson Plans

Electrical Circuits Teacher Guide and Student Activities

Lesson Plans by Oliver Smith

Electrical energy is a major part of modern day life, but is so often misunderstood. We’ve all sat during a thunderstorm and wondered at the deadly power of lightning. We all know not to touch sockets with wet hands, but do we understand why our hands should be dry? Electricity controls many major functions of our bodies, especially in the brain and nervous system, and is also an extremely versatile resource used in homes and businesses all over the world. The following activities will help students understand the foundation of electrical circuits and how electricity affects our lives every day.


Electrical Circuits

Storyboard Description

Circuit components & Electric circuit symbols activity - Help students remember what each symbol stands for and what it does

Storyboard Text

  • Symbol
  • Use
  • Wire
  • Wires are used to connect different components together. They are made of metal and allow current to flow through them.
  • Battery
  • A battery provides the push to move the charge around the circuit.
  • 
  • Resistor
  • A resistor is a component that reduces the current in a circuit.
  • 
  • Variable Resistor
  • A variable resistor is a resistor which can have its resistance changed.
  • Lamp
  • A lamp is a component with a filament that glows when a current is passed through it. Lamps can be used to see things in the dark.
  • Switch
  • A switch is a component that can break the circuit, allowing other components to be turned on and off. A light switch is an example of a switch.
  • Voltmeter
  • A voltmeter is used to measure the potential difference, or amount of push, between two parts in a circuit.
  • Ammeter
  • An ammeter is used to measure the size of a current in a circuit
  • 
  • Image Attributions:Current Indicator (https://www.flickr.com/photos/robbie1/1769929/) - Robbie1 - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)insulator (https://www.flickr.com/photos/suigetsu/189766481/) - tuba_squad - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)battery (https://www.flickr.com/photos/razor512/2109796582/) - Razor512 - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)Bulb (https://www.flickr.com/photos/xenoargento/2379923832/) - rivalslayer - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)Motor (https://www.flickr.com/photos/wapster/2681193434/) - Podknox - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)Radio (https://www.flickr.com/photos/egoant/3704342810/) - EgoAnt - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)Carbon Composition Resistor (https://www.flickr.com/photos/nao904/6200845389/) - nao904 - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)Switch (https://www.flickr.com/photos/lamdogjunkie/9296951538/) - lamdogjunkie - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)PUSH (https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevensnodgrass/6117660537/) - Steve Snodgrass - License: Attribution (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)
  • Motor
  • A motor spins when it is connected to a circuit. It could be used to make a toy car move.