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Voting Rights Timeline
Updated: 10/8/2020
Voting Rights Timeline
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Election Process in US

Elections in the United States

Teacher Guide by Matt Campbell

Every four years, citizens of the United States exercise one of the most powerful rights they have: their right to vote for the President of the United States. While there are many opportunities throughout the year to vote in smaller or local elections, this specific election grants them the ability to choose the candidate that they believe will serve the American people, protect the country, and improve our way of life.




US Elections

Storyboard Description

Voting Rights Timeline activity example

Storyboard Text

  • 15th AMENDMENT RATIFIED
  • Voting Station
  • Ballots
  • History Of Voting Rights In America
  • On February 26th 1870, the 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified. The 15th Amendment states that no one can be denied a vote "on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude." However, many states instituted poll taxes, literacy tests, and sometimes threats of violence to suppress the African American vote.
  • Voting Booths
  • 19th AMENDMENT RATIFIED
  • THE TIME IS NOWWOMEN'S RIGHTS ARE HUMAN RIGHTS
  • 24th AMENDMENT RATIFIED
  • ENTRANCE TO VOTING STATION
  • On June 4th, 1920, white women in the United States were finally given the right to vote after a lengthy campaign to achieve suffrage. Although some states failed to ratify the amendment, more than 8 million women cast their vote in the election of 1920.
  • MR. PRESIDENT, HOW LONG MUST WOMEN WAIT FOR LIBERTY?
  • WOMEN ARE RUDDERLESS....WE NEED THE BALLOT!
  • Poll Taxes
  • On August 27th 1962, the 24th Amendment was passed. States were no longer allowed to implement a poll tax for voters. Poll taxes are fees that citizens have to pay in order to vote. Because of this, many poor Americans were unable to vote. Now, poor and disenfranchised citizens were able to vote for politicians that would help fight for more economic opportunities to break the cycle of poverty.
  • Poll Taxes
  • Voting Accessibility for the Elderly and Handicapped Act
  • HandicapAccessible Booth
  • 2020 Ballot
  • Handicap Accessible Booth
  • 2020 Ballot
  • On September 28th, 1984 the Voting Accessibility for the Elderly and Handicapped Act was passed by Congress. Polling places must now be physically accessible to people with disabilities for federal elections. This law officially made it possible for more citizens to have a voice in their government as physical limitations had previously prevented some from being able to vote.
  • UOCAVA PASSED
  • In August 1986, the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA) was passed by Congress. This law allows members of the U.S. Uniformed Services, their family members, and U.S. citizens residing outside of the United States to be able to vote in U.S. elections.
  • Ballots to be Shipped
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