https://www.storyboardthat.com/teacher-guide/red-kayak-by-priscilla-cummings

Red Kayak by Priscilla Cummings

Teacher Guide by Elizabeth Pedro

Find this Common Core aligned Teacher Guide and more like it in our Elementary School Category!

Student Activities for Red Kayak Include:

"Red Kayak", a short text extracted from a longer novel of the same name, is about a boy named Brady who searches for a missing three-year-old on the Corsica River. "Red Kayak" by Priscilla Cummings features an exciting plot, rich vocabulary, and various figurative language elements.

By the end of this lesson your students will create amazing storyboards like the ones below!




Start My Free Trial

A Quick Synopsis of "Red Kayak"

Thirteen-year-old Brady saw Mrs. DiAngelo and her son, Ben, heading down the Creek in their red kayak. He knew that it was not safe, but he didn’t say anything. Now, they are missing. Brady and Tilly, his yellow Lab, hop in their boat and head toward the smaller creeks to search for the red boat or their yellow jackets, while Carl and the rest of the rescue workers look downstream.

Brady feels excited, but nervous as he heads up the creek; he is eager to find the red kayak. He feels the cold and thinks back to when he was eight when he fell through the ice in a cow pond and almost drowned. Brady shuts off his engine and begins shouting for Mrs. DiAngelo and Ben. When he doesn’t hear a response, he turns the engine on and continues up the creek. He checks his phone and notices a missed call: it is his mother. She tells him that Mrs. DiAngelo was found downriver, but Ben is still missing.

Brady continues to search for Ben when Tilly begins barking. Brady relies on Tilly’s instincts and continues moving in the direction of Tilly’s pointed nose. All of a sudden, Tilly places his front paws on the edge of the boat. Brady slows down the motor and approaches a narrow channel with an old dock. There, Brady notices a spot of yellow.

Ben is motionless, and his life jacket is caught on an old piece of wood.Brady flips the engine into neutral and lifts a waterlogged Ben off of the wood and into the boat. He removes Ben’s wet clothes and replaces them with his own coat. During this task, Brady fumbles with his cell phone and it falls into the water. Frightened, Brady tries to remember what he was taught to do in an emergency. He recalls Carl talking about the ABC’s: check airway, check breathing, check circulation. Brady checks Ben’s nose and tilts him on his side, which causes water to trickle out of his mouth. Then, he checks his nose and decides that Ben isn’t breathing. Brady decides to start CPR on Ben; he presses down five times on his chest, then gives him a breath, repeating this over and over again. Brady realizes that he needs to get Ben to an ambulance fast. He begins to steer the boat down the creek, all while continuing CPR.

Finally, Brady makes it to the landing where an ambulance and police cars are waiting. Jimmy Landers, one of Carl’s co-workers, lifts Ben onto the dock and Carl continues with the CPR. Carl feels a pulse on Ben and send him off in the ambulance.

A policeman comes over and compliments Brady on his hard work and asks for a report of what happened. After Brady gives him the details, he gets back into his boat to head home. Brady reflects on what happened and thinks about fate; he wonders what would’ve happened to Ben if he hadn’t been there to check the little creeks. He realizes he will never be the same person because he helped save a life.


Essential Questions for "Red Kayak"

  1. What inspires people to act courageously?
  2. What do you think makes people act to save others?
  3. Do you think a person should risk their life to save another life? Why or why not?

Red Kayak Lesson Plans, Student Activities and Graphic Organizers

Plot Diagram | "Red Kayak" Summary


Copy Assignment



A common use for Storyboard That is to help students create a plot diagram of the events from a story. Not only is this a great way to teach the parts of the plot, but it reinforces major events and help students develop greater understanding of literary structures. Sometimes students will really have to think carefully about which events are major turning points in the plot.

Students can create a storyboard capturing the narrative arc in a work with a six-cell storyboard containing the major parts of the plot diagram. For each cell, have students create a scene that follows the selection in sequence using: Exposition, Conflict, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution. An additional challenge would be to diagram the entire book, also entitled Red Kayak, which has a much different feel to it.



Example "Red Kayak" Plot Diagram

Exposition

Brady sees his new neighbor, Mrs. DiAngelo, taking her red kayak out on the creek with her three year old son. He knows it isn't safe because of tides and winds, but doesn't stop them.


Conflict

Brady finds out that Mrs. DiAngelo and her son, Ben, are missing after going out on the creek.


Rising Action

Brady and his dog, Tilly, join the search for the missing DiAngelos. Carl and the other rescuers look downstream, while Brady goes off on his own.


Climax

With the help of Tilly's instincts, Brady finds little Ben, but he is not breathing! Brady tries to remember what to do in an emergency.


Falling Action

Brady remembers what Carl said about ABC: check airway, check breathing, check circulation. He desperately performs CPR on Ben and steers the boat back to shore.


Resolution

The paramedics find Ben's pulse. Brady reflects on what happened and thinks about fate; he wonders what would’ve happened to Ben if he hadn’t been there to check the little creeks. He realizes he will never be the same person because he helped save a life.


(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Assignment", change the description of the assignment in your Dashboard.)


Student Instructions

Create a visual plot diagram of the selection from Red Kayak.


  1. Click "Use this Template" from the assignment.
  2. Separate the story into the Exposition, Conflict, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, and Resolution.
  3. Create an image that represents an important moment or set of events for each of the story components.
  4. Write a description of each of the steps in the plot diagram.
  5. Save and submit the assignment. Make sure to use the drop-down menu to save it under the assignment title.



(Modify this basic rubric by clicking the link below. You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)





Copy Assignment

Start My Free Trial

"Red Kayak" Characters Graphic Organizer

In this activity, students create an outline for the characters in the story, paying close attention to the feelings and actions of both major and minor characters. Students can also provide detailed information regarding the character’s actions, how they influence other characters, and how the main character changed over time.

You can click on this map and create a copy on your teacher account. Use it as is, or to edit it for the level of your class. Printing it as worksheets, for your students to complete while reading, is a fast and easy way to incorporate this character map into your classroom.

Here is an example for Brady Parks:

  • Traits: Courageous and determined
  • How does this character change over time? Brady realizes the impact he made in saving Ben's life.
  • What challenges does this character face? Brady is faced with the challenge of finding Ben. Brady deals with cold, rainy weather. Brady drops his phone in the water.
Start My Free Trial

"Red Kayak" Theme


Themes, symbols, and motifs come alive when you use a storyboard. In this activity, students will identify themes and symbols from the story, and support their choices with details from the text.

An important theme of Red Kayak is determination. Brady has incredible determination in searching for Ben and does not give up until he finds him.


Three pieces of evidence for this theme are:


  1. “If that red kayak was out there, I wanted to be the one to find it.”
  2. “Brady is freezing, but tells his mother, ‘I need to keep looking!’”
  3. “I ignored the rain, the cold - everything - and just continued. Five compressions, another breath, a quick check to make sure the boat was headed in the right direction.”

Start My Free Trial

"Red Kayak" Vocabulary

Another great way to engage your students is by creating a storyboard that uses vocabulary from "Red Kayak".

In this activity, students demonstrate their understanding of vocabulary words using sentences and corresponding images with the Frayer Model. Students may be provided the vocabulary words, or they can use words that they have discovered through their reading of the text. The sentences and images validate the understanding of the word and the context that it was used in the novel.

This example uses the word reluctantly:

  • Definition: unwilling, disinclined, not wanting to do something

  • Characteristics: "I reluctantly turned my boat up the creek, slowed down some, and kept searching."

  • Examples: carefully, cautiously, hesitantly, warily

  • Non-examples: eagerly, enthusiastically, ready, willing

Start My Free Trial

"Red Kayak" Figurative Language


Copy Assignment



"Red Kayak" contains various types of figurative language, especially similes, idioms, and hyperbole. Figurative languages adds depth to the story and lets the readers interpret messages from the author in a different way than straightforward text elements.

In this activity, students can display their understanding of figurative language by identifying examples and creating a literal or figurative portrayal of the figurative language.

Three examples of figurative language used in "Red Kayak" are:

      Simile: “his face pale as a sheet…”
      Idiom: “barking up a storm”
      Hyperbole: “I was scared to death.”

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Assignment", change the description of the assignment in your Dashboard.)


Student Instructions

Create a storyboard that shows three examples of figurative language in "Red Kayak".


  1. Click "Use this Template" from the assignment.
  2. Identify use of figurative language in the text.
  3. Put the type of figurative language (such as simile or metaphor) in the title box.
  4. Give an example from the text in the description box.
  5. Illustrate the example using using a combination of scenes, characters, and items.



(Modify this basic rubric by clicking the link below. You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)





Copy Assignment

Start My Free Trial

Text Evidence in "Red Kayak"


Copy Assignment



In this activity, students will be provided a question or prompt to answer using textual evidence. Examining text evidence from "Red Kayak" will help students make connections and enable readers to pinpoint important parts of the story.

The prompt here is, “How does Brady overcome challenges?”

The three examples provided include:


  1. Determination: "I kept on with the CPR. I knew I couldn't stop."
  2. Thinks about this training: "What do I do? What do I do? I was asking myself. What would Carl do?"
  3. Remains calm: "I did not think about anything else as I did this. All I was doing was counting and pushing and breathing and praying inside that Ben would start breathing."

(These instructions are completely customizable. After clicking "Copy Assignment", change the description of the assignment in your Dashboard.)


Student Instructions

Create a storyboard that answers the prompt using at least three examples from "Red Kayak". Click on "Add Cells" to change the number of examples.


  1. Type the question into the central black box.
  2. Type an answer in your own words in the title box.
  3. Think about examples from the text that support your answer.
  4. Type text evidence in the description boxes. Paraphrase or quote directly from the text.
  5. Illustrate each example using scenes, characters, items, etc.


(Modify this basic rubric by clicking the link below. You can also create your own on Quick Rubric.)





Copy Assignment

Start My Free Trial

Help Share Storyboard That!

Looking for More?

Check out the rest of our Teacher Guides and Lesson Plans!


All Teacher Guides and Lesson Plans Ed Tech BlogElementary SchoolMiddle School ELAHigh School ELAForeign LanguageSpecial EdUS History and Social StudiesWorld History

Our Posters on ZazzleOur Lessons on Teachers Pay Teachers
https://www.storyboardthat.com/teacher-guide/red-kayak-by-priscilla-cummings
© 2017 - Clever Prototypes, LLC - All rights reserved.
Want a Free Trial? Learn More about our Educational Edition     Start My Free Trial
Explore Our Articles and Examples

Try Our Other Websites!

Photos for Class – Search for School-Safe, Creative Commons Photos! (It Even Cites for You!)
Quick Rubric – Easily Make and Share Great Looking Rubrics!
Prefer a different language?

•   (English) Red Kayak   •   (Español) Red Kayak   •   (Français) Kayak Rouge   •   (Deutsch) Roter Kajak   •   (Italiana) Red Kayak   •   (Nederlands) Red Kayak   •   (Português) Caiaque Vermelho   •   (עברית) קיאק אדום   •   (العَرَبِيَّة) الأحمر كاياك   •   (हिन्दी) लाल कश्ती   •   (ру́сский язы́к) Красный Kayak   •   (Dansk) Rød Kajak   •   (Svenska) Red Kayak   •   (Suomi) Punainen Kayak   •   (Norsk) Red Kayak   •   (Türkçe) Kırmızı Kayık   •   (Polski) Czerwona Kajak   •   (Româna) Red Caiac   •   (Ceština) Red Kayak   •   (Slovenský) Červený Kajak   •   (Magyar) Red Kajak   •   (Hrvatski) Crveni Kajak   •   (български) Червен Каяк   •   (Lietuvos) Raudona Baidarių   •   (Slovenščina) Red Kajak   •   (Latvijas) Red Kayak   •   (eesti) Red Kayak